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Woman claims failure to diagnose led to husband’s death

On behalf of posted in Medical Malpractice on Thursday July 2, 2015

Most medical care workers in Massachusetts are well-trained professionals dedicated to their patients. As a result, patients and their families trust these workers to adequately diagnose and treat their medical issues. Failure to diagnose an issue, such as heart problems, can lead to a patient’s death or serious injury, potentially resulting in a medical malpractice suit. One out-of-state woman claims that medical negligence led to her husband’s death.

According to information presented at trial, the victim was transported to the hospital in May 2009. He was experiencing dizziness and chest pain. An EKG was conducted, but the cardiologist — one of the defendants in the lawsuit — concluded that it was normal, and the man was discharged.

However, the patient continued to experience chest pain and returned to the hospital several hours later. The same cardiologist determined that an EKG and stress test were normal. The patient was once again released with directions to follow-up with the cardiologist in four weeks and a prescription for medicines to treat acid reflect. Unfortunately, the man collapsed at his home a few weeks later. He died as a result of a heart attack.

The man’s wife claims that had the cardiologist and his partner ordered additional tests and correctly interpreted the results of the stress test and EKG, they would have known that the man was at risk for a heart attack. A jury recently agreed with her assertions, awarding her approximately $2.4 million in damages. As this case demonstrates, failure to diagnose a condition can have serious ramifications. Those in Massachusetts who have suffered as a result of such medical malpractice also have the option seeking to hold doctors responsible for negligent treatment. By doing so, future patients could be protected from similar harm.

Source: ctpost.com, “Shelton widow awarded $2.5 million in malpractice case“, Daniel Tepfer, June 27, 2015

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